1. How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
    “You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.
    Lewis Carroll (via everythingiscopacetic)
    Reblogged from: everythingiscopacetic
  2. steampunktendencies:

    Archangels’ - Steampunk Angel Acoustic ~Johnny Gore Musicshop

    Reblogged from: steampunktendencies
  3. There certainly is some reason a story attracted you, and you’re writing it trying to find out that reason.
    Reblogged from: theparisreview
  4. Tool - The Ultimate Review - Full Documentary

  5. The most important thing a writer can have [is] the ability to live with the constant loneliness and a strong sense of revulsion for the banalities of everyday socializing.
    Hunter S. Thompson (via writingquotes)
    Reblogged from: writingquotes
  6. Charlie Musselwhite-Christo Redemptor

  7. ‘Bo Diddley (1965)’ by Bo Diddley is my new jam.
  8. We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.
    Anaïs Nin (via wordpainting)
    Reblogged from: wordpainting
  9. Florence Owens Thompson, a woman whose picture became the symbol of poverty during the Great Depression, was already on the West Coast and could’ve reported that the job market wasn’t any better there. Born in Oklahoma in 1903, Thompson’s family no longer lived on their Cherokee tribal lands after being evicted by the U.S. government. She met her first husband, Cleo Owens, in Mississippi after her family moved to the state. They married in 1921, and she moved with him and members of his family to the area around Sacramento, California to look for work. When Cleo died in 1931, the couple had five children and Thompson was pregnant with their sixth. (via Who was the Woman in the Famous Great Depression Photograph?)

    Florence Owens Thompson, a woman whose picture became the symbol of poverty during the Great Depression, was already on the West Coast and could’ve reported that the job market wasn’t any better there. Born in Oklahoma in 1903, Thompson’s family no longer lived on their Cherokee tribal lands after being evicted by the U.S. government. She met her first husband, Cleo Owens, in Mississippi after her family moved to the state. They married in 1921, and she moved with him and members of his family to the area around Sacramento, California to look for work. When Cleo died in 1931, the couple had five children and Thompson was pregnant with their sixth. (via Who was the Woman in the Famous Great Depression Photograph?)

  10. You Can’t Explain Logic - May You Have Great Wisdom

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Madness Reigns

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